Introduction: An Inquiry Stance for Teaching and Learning

by Jill Eurich

In the next blog postings that I will be writing I am going to consider how an inquiry stance can be effective within any instructional framework. To begin to explore this powerful tool, let’s consider these ideas from Judith Wells Lindfors in her book, Children’s Inquiry: Using Language to Make Sense of the World.

 “Acts of inquiry stand as the ultimate act of going beyond: going beyond present understanding (intellectual); going beyond self to engage the help of another (social) but ever going beyond as self (personal).” (Lindfors, p. 14)

“Inquiry involves students in interactions that are abundant, diverse and authentic.”  (Lindfors, p. 67)

“If a teacher is modeling an “inquiry stance” for students, she is most likely asking real questions.  These types of questions are ones you actually wonder about yourself.  They are what Albritton called “honest questions” and Lindfors calls “acts of inquiry.”” (Lindfors, p. 113- 114)

Whether we are sharing an interactive read-aloud, teaching reading, writing, poetry, or word study, an inquiry stance allows us to delve deeply into a topic with students, to explore alongside of them as they investigate patterns in words, writer’s craft in texts they are reading or are being read to them, an author’s perspective, a character’s dilemma, a problem being tackled beyond the world they know, connections across books or poems. Most of all a stance of inquiry is a habit of mind in which, “curious creative meaning-makers are engaging one another in their attempts to further their probing into the workings of the world.” (Lindfors, p. 127)

Source

Lindfors, J.W. (1999). Children’s inquiry: Using language to make sense of the world. New York: Teachers College Press.

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